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Riley Ranch Nature Reserve

19975 Glen Vista Rd, Bend, OR 97701, USA

Directions



Riley-Ranch-in-Bend-Oregon

Located on the northwest edge of Bend, Riley Ranch Nature Reserve is 184 acres featuring 35 acres of canyon floor along the Deschutes River and a 30-acre band of rimrock cliffs. This mostly rugged terrain offers a near-to-home nature experience unlike others provided by Bend Park & Recreation District.

From its unique location adjacent to the Deschutes River, Riley Ranch Nature Reserve offers dramatic views of the Cascade Mountain Range and the river canyon.

Appearing relatively untouched in some places, the land features open meadows, juniper and pine forests, unique lava flows, cliffs and the river’s rocky canyon. The park is host to many native plant species, migratory birds and wildlife.

There are 1.57 miles of soft-surface trail above the canyon and 1.25 miles of rugged trail running on The Canyon Loop. Riley Ranch also has connectivity to Tumalo State Park.

Individuals to small groups up to 30 are welcome. Dogs and bikes are not allowed.

New experiences, new rules.

Because Riley Ranch is a nature reserve it is managed differently than other Bend parks. With direction from the park’s Citizens Advisory Committee and the District’s board, bikes and dogs, even dogs onleash, are not permitted.

Bikes and dogs have a greater impact on wildlife and the landscape when compared to pedestrians. Riley Ranch provides a different experience for park users with numerous wildlife viewing opportunities as well as a place for people who are less comfortable around dogs or bikes.

 

Sunrise to Sunset

19975 Glen Vista Rd, Bend, OR 97701, USA (Directions)

Lot Parking

184 acres

Click here for Park Rules and Guidelines

Rental or facility information:

For feedback on the parks, trails or facilities, email info@bendparksandrec.org

There is 1.57 miles of paved path and soft-surface trail that navigate in a “figure eight” loop above the canyon through relatively untouched land features, such as open meadows, juniper and pine forests, unique lava flows, cliffs and the river’s rocky canyon. This figure 8 loop is composed of  two smaller loops. Juniper Loop, which is connected to the parking lot to the east is 0.7 miles. To the east of the Juniper loop is Sage Flats Loop, which is 0.9 miles. The stretch that heads down the canyon rim is called Robin’s Run, which links to the 1.25-mile long Canyon Loop.

Traveling through Riley Ranch to the North end of the canyon, trail users can travel through the Tumalo State Park trail for a 6.5-mile hike or run.

Accessible Trail
Accessed from the parking lot, there is a small loop of accessible 8-foot-wide paved paths, which does not connect to the soft surface path into the steep-grade canyon trail.

Riley Ranch has interpretive signs to help you learn more about the geology, history and ecosystem of Riley Ranch Nature Reserve. There are signs located at each entrance and overlook.

History lessons

Formerly known as Gopher Gulch, the property has been renamed Riley Ranch Nature Reserve in honor of O.B. Riley, who made an original homestead claim on a portion of the property. There are two cabin ruins at Riley Ranch that provide visitors a glimpse of those days. Made of hand-hewn, saddle-notched logs, the cabins may have been constructed prior to 1900. One cabin appears to consist of two rooms: a collapsed masonry fireplace can be seen on the common wall separating the main living space from a second room or possible porch. Also visible in the main room are baseboards and flat-sawn logs, most likely made by a large two-man buck saw. The other cabin does not appear to have been a residence and may have been used for livestock or storage of supplies.

Wildlife Appreciation

Riley Ranch is home to many species of birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. When you visit, be on the lookout for Red-tailed hawk, Great horned owl, Northern Pacific tree frog, mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk, coyote, porcupine, bobcat, black-tailed jackrabbit and many more.

Fishing in Riley Ranch

The Deschutes River is home to many species of native fish and some of the most idyllic fishing spots reside in public Bend parks. At Riley Ranch, use the Canyon Loop trail to access portions of the Deschutes River. Look for water access points and please refrain from creating new access points and disturbing natural vegetation.

Licenses: All state angling licenses and regulations apply at all locations.

Bait: Whether bait and/or fly fishing is allowed depends on location. Please check ODFW’s website for more information as regulations may change.

Interested in fishing in Bend parks?  Learn more.

Because Riley Ranch is a nature reserve it is managed differently than other Bend parks. With direction from the park’s Citizens Advisory Committee and the District’s board, bikes and dogs, even dogs onleash, are not permitted.

Bikes and dogs have a greater impact on wildlife and the landscape when compared to pedestrians. Riley Ranch provides a different experience for park users with numerous wildlife viewing opportunities as well as a place for people who are less comfortable around dogs or bikes.

features

Riley Ranch Trails

There is 1.57 miles of paved path and soft-surface trail that navigate in a “figure eight” loop above the canyon through relatively untouched land features, such as open meadows, juniper and pine forests, unique lava flows, cliffs and the river’s rocky canyon. This figure 8 loop is composed of  two smaller loops. Juniper Loop, which is connected to the parking lot to the east is 0.7 miles. To the east of the Juniper loop is Sage Flats Loop, which is 0.9 miles. The stretch that heads down the canyon rim is called Robin’s Run, which links to the 1.25-mile long Canyon Loop.

Traveling through Riley Ranch to the North end of the canyon, trail users can travel through the Tumalo State Park trail for a 6.5-mile hike or run.

Accessible Trail
Accessed from the parking lot, there is a small loop of accessible 8-foot-wide paved paths, which does not connect to the soft surface path into the steep-grade canyon trail.

Explore the Park

Riley Ranch has interpretive signs to help you learn more about the geology, history and ecosystem of Riley Ranch Nature Reserve. There are signs located at each entrance and overlook.

History lessons

Formerly known as Gopher Gulch, the property has been renamed Riley Ranch Nature Reserve in honor of O.B. Riley, who made an original homestead claim on a portion of the property. There are two cabin ruins at Riley Ranch that provide visitors a glimpse of those days. Made of hand-hewn, saddle-notched logs, the cabins may have been constructed prior to 1900. One cabin appears to consist of two rooms: a collapsed masonry fireplace can be seen on the common wall separating the main living space from a second room or possible porch. Also visible in the main room are baseboards and flat-sawn logs, most likely made by a large two-man buck saw. The other cabin does not appear to have been a residence and may have been used for livestock or storage of supplies.

Wildlife Appreciation

Riley Ranch is home to many species of birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. When you visit, be on the lookout for Red-tailed hawk, Great horned owl, Northern Pacific tree frog, mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk, coyote, porcupine, bobcat, black-tailed jackrabbit and many more.

Fishing in Riley Ranch

The Deschutes River is home to many species of native fish and some of the most idyllic fishing spots reside in public Bend parks. At Riley Ranch, use the Canyon Loop trail to access portions of the Deschutes River. Look for water access points and please refrain from creating new access points and disturbing natural vegetation.

Licenses: All state angling licenses and regulations apply at all locations.

Bait: Whether bait and/or fly fishing is allowed depends on location. Please check ODFW’s website for more information as regulations may change.

Interested in fishing in Bend parks?  Learn more.

Why No Dogs?

Because Riley Ranch is a nature reserve it is managed differently than other Bend parks. With direction from the park’s Citizens Advisory Committee and the District’s board, bikes and dogs, even dogs onleash, are not permitted.

Bikes and dogs have a greater impact on wildlife and the landscape when compared to pedestrians. Riley Ranch provides a different experience for park users with numerous wildlife viewing opportunities as well as a place for people who are less comfortable around dogs or bikes.

Map PDF Download

Contact

Rental or facility information:

For feedback on the parks, trails or facilities, email info@bendparksandrec.org